Global Flower Shortage Doesn’t Stop Saratoga Flower Shop

As flowers fill the Posie Peddler ahead of Mother’s Day, colors are exploding inside the Saratoga boutique this spring.

“I love peonies this season,” owner Tim Healy said.


What do you want to know

  • There is a global shortage of fresh flowers, especially those grown for events like weddings
  • Nearly a quarter of a million jobs in the floral industry were lost in 2020, according to the National Association of Wholesale Distributors
  • Flower farms have destroyed tons of flowers due to the pandemic, as many of them have been closed for quarantine.

“This one is only available one month a year,” says floral designer Tina Dalaba. “When Boronia is available, you know it’s spring!”

It’s been a busy year and the owner says business never really slowed down, even during the pandemic.

“Much of society has put their lives into perspective after the pandemic,” Healy said.

“A lot of people couldn’t see the people, so they started sending them flowers of course,” Dalaba said. “A lot of people sent flowers to places like hospitals, and even wanted to spruce up their Zoom backgrounds!”

The Saratoga business has been around for over a century. It has been in the family since 1910 and Healy just bought the store from the family last year at unprecedented times. He says he hopes to keep the store’s longstanding traditions alive.

“I think quality and price is paramount above all else because it’s not something that’s going to last forever,” Healy said. “So when it comes to living, you want to be as beautiful as possible.”

But maintaining quality and price can be difficult as the cost of flowers rises and a global shortage looms. There is a global shortage of fresh flowers, especially those grown for events like weddings. Healy says it was a direct impact of the pandemic. Flower farms have destroyed tons of flowers due to the pandemic, as many of them have been closed for quarantine.

“They cut them all down and threw them away, because they couldn’t do anything with them and later they didn’t have the labor to plant the next crop,” he said.

Nearly a quarter of a million jobs in the floral industry were lost in 2020, according to the National Association of Wholesale Distributors. Unfortunately, the pandemic has wiped out entire flower farms around the world, as demand increases with the wedding boom. And the hits keep coming with supply chain issues and gas prices.

“Not just gasoline for our delivery drivers, but also fees that wholesalers have to add to their regular delivery charges to deliver the flowers,” he said.

Fortunately, with a cooler full of blooming flowers, Healy says he hasn’t felt the shortage much because he works with local wholesalers in the capital region.

“Not only will you get what you want, but you’ll also support local families and businesses,” he said.

This season, he’s making sure he’s stocked up and ready to push petals out the door, just in time for a banner year.

“One thing I never had to worry about was not being busy enough,” Healey said. “We can accommodate the high end and we can accommodate the low end. We think everyone should know about flowers if they want them.

Healy says with the shortage, it’s important that clients and engaged couples book their floral services as soon as possible. Inquiries or orders can be placed directly on the store’s website.

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